Stuff for today

I will be doing the same tonight, just posting links and excerpts as my internet here (and just about everywhere in the Philippines using the same service) has not recovered from its utter slowness.
NYSE, Nasdaq clash in debutantes’ brawl – WSJ
The New York Stock Exchange is scoring victories in its battle to wrest listings of initial public offerings away from the Nasdaq Stock Market.
So far this year, the Big Board holds a lead of more than 2-to-1 over Nasdaq, with 11, or 73%, of the 15 new-issue listings, according to Thomson Reuters.
Germany, France post surprise GDP growth – WSJ
German and French economies both grew 0.3% in the second quarter, faring much better than expected and helping ease the contraction of the wider euro-zone GDP, which shrunk by 0.1%.

I will be doing the same tonight, just posting links and excerpts as my internet here (and just about everywhere in the Philippines using the same service) has not recovered from its utter slowness.

NYSE, Nasdaq clash in debutantes’ brawl – WSJ

The New York Stock Exchange is scoring victories in its battle to wrest listings of initial public offerings away from the Nasdaq Stock Market.

So far this year, the Big Board holds a lead of more than 2-to-1 over Nasdaq, with 11, or 73%, of the 15 new-issue listings, according to Thomson Reuters.

Germany, France post surprise GDP growth – WSJ

German and French economies both grew 0.3% in the second quarter, faring much better than expected and helping ease the contraction of the wider euro-zone GDP, which shrunk by 0.1%.

Switzerland, UBS settle US tax case – WSJ

UBS AG and the Swiss and U.S. governments have finalized a settlement in a tax-evasion investigation that will allow UBS clients to appeal to a Swiss tribunal before their account information is handed to U.S. tax collectors, according to a person familiar with the situation.

Food firms warn of sugar shortage – WSJ

Some of America’s biggest food companies say the U.S. could “virtually run out of sugar” if the Obama administration doesn’t ease import restrictions amid soaring prices for the key commodity.

US foreclosure filings set third record-high in five months – Bloomberg

Foreclosure filings in the U.S. climbed to a record for the third time in five months in July as falling home prices and the recession left more homeowners unable to keep up payments or refinance.

A total of 360,149 properties received a default or auction notice or were seized last month, according to data seller RealtyTrac Inc. One in 355 households got a filing, the highest monthly rate in RealtyTrac records dating to January 2005, the Irvine, California-based company said in a statement.

Huge bonus hangs over pay review – NYT

Citigroup is planning to claim that an energy trader who is due to receive compensation of $100 million this year should be exempt from review by a federal authority given responsibility for setting pay packages at financial companies that received taxpayer bailouts, executives at the bank said Wednesday.

Can econometricians tell us which macroeconomic model is best? – Economist’s View

Much of the uncertainty in economics derives from our inability to do laboratory experiments, and that includes uncertainty about which model best describes the macroeconmy.

When the present crisis is finally over, those who advocated fiscal policy, those who advocated monetary policy, and those who advocated no policy at all will all say “I told you so” based upon their reading of the evidence.

Has the no-volume bear market rally ended? – Pragmatic Capitalist

The 50% move in the S&P 500 has exhibited many of the characteristics of a secular bear market rally: It has been on declining volume; it has been very low quality in terms of asset gains; there is very little real leadership outside of technology names; and perhaps most importantly, the move has been very swift.

Retail sales dipped, initial jobless claims rose in July – WSJ

U.S. retail sales unexpectedly fell in July despite the debut of the government’s “cash for clunkers” program meant to jump-start the auto business and help turn around the economy.

Initial claims for jobless benefits rose by 4,000 to 558,000 on a seasonally adjusted basis in the week ending Aug. 8, the Labor Department said in its weekly report Thursday. The four-week average of new claims, which aims to smooth volatility in the data, rose by 8,500 to 565,000 — the highest since July 18.

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